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Step By Step Tips On How To Prepare Agidi [Eko]

Agidi or eko (as the Yorubas call it) is one of those foods you admire and would love to make but can’t yet figure out whether it is actually made from corn or from yam. lol.
 Hopefully, this recipe will answer every question you have about this food.

Agidi or eko is called corn meal in English.

Agidi or Eko

I love to serve Agidi with beans and tomato stew. In Igboland, it is often served with banga stew. I have also seen a combination of agidi and akara or moi moi. This is how I serve Agidi.

This is not difficult at all, all you would need is just corn, chiffon cloth, bowls and lots of water. I hear you can also make agidi with store-bought corn starch but I haven’t tried that yet.

This is the age-old recipe that shows you how to make corn meal from the scratch, the same way they make the ones you buy from the street corners or mama Ugochukwu (as in my case)

Ingredients | Serving: 6
8 cups of corn
Chiffon cloth
Bowls
Lots of clean water
Uma leaves
Preparation Time : 2 Hours.

Uma leaves are used for wrapping agidi or moi moi in Nigeria but you don’t need it if you are making agidi for your family. Just pour into plate and allow to cool.

The chiffon cloth is tied over the big bowl and used to separate the chaff from the starch.

You can only use the dried corn for agidi and pap. You cannot use newly harvested corn because it will not turn out right. Soak the corn in water for 24 hours.

How To Make Agidi

Wash the corn and transfer into a cooking pot, add water to cover them and set on heat. Stir occasional and turn off the heat when it is about to boil.

Drain the water and take the corn to the grinding mill, There are lots of places to grind agidi corn in Nigeria for a very little amount of money. You may not use a blender.

How to make agidi

Grind the corn and rinse it.

Drape the chiffon cloth over a big bowl and tie it up. Scoop in some ground corn in handful portions and tart rubbing it on the surface while adding water. At some point you will feel just the chaff. Remove it and scoop in more ground corn.
At the point when your hand can feel the water in the bowl from the top of the chiffon cloth, stop adding water and just rinse the ground corn.

washing agidi

Once ground corn is mixed with enough water, the starch will escape into the bowl as you keep robbing on them while the chaff is left on the surface. This should be easy.

Remove the chiffon cloth once you are done and allow the starch in the bowl to sit for up to 3 hours.

After three hours, the starch should have settled at the bottom of the bowl and water on top. Decant – pour out the clear water and stir what is left with a wooden turner. It should not be as thick as dissolved pap or custard and it shouldn’t be too watery either.

Making eko
Prepared
eko-agidi

It should be about 2 litters (2000ml) if you used 8 cups of corn. Pour into a pot, set on heat and start stirring with a wooden turner. The heat shouldn’t be too much, if it is forming solid crumbs, then the heat is too much. Reduce it a little.

Continue stirring until it looks like prepared pap but maybe a little thicker. This should take about 15 minutes before you get to this point. Pour into smaller plates or use a leave to wrap. My video shows you how to use the leaves and gives you a visual version of how to make agidi or eko the Nigerian way.

Allow 1-3 hours for the agidi to cool and solidify. Serve with boiled beans and tomato stew. I love it that way. You can also serve with moi moi or akara.

That is how to make Agidi white, the Yorubas call it eko. 

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Written by BJ

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